Chapter 22

Greenhouse Insect and Mite Pest Management

(draft book excerpts)

The warm, humid conditions and abundant food in a greenhouse provide an excellent, stable environment for pest development. Often, the natural enemies that serve to keep pests under control outside are not present in the greenhouse. For these reasons, pest situations often develop in this indoor environment more rapidly and with greater severity than outdoors. Successful control of insect and mite pests on greenhouse crops depends on several tactics. These include regular scouting or monitoring for problems, identifying pests and their life stages, keeping good records of pest management practices, using exclusion techniques, practicing good sanitation, testing soil or plants for nutrients, using biological controls when possible, and using selective pesticides, properly timed and applied. Some greenhouse insects can transmit diseases to the crops which are often more serious than the feeding injury that the insect causes. These insect “vectors” include some aphids, leafhoppers, thrips and whiteflies. In these instances, the diseases must be managed through early insect control.

Click on the following topics for more information on greenhouse insect and mite pest management.

Topics Within This Chapter:

  • Biology of Insects
  • Insect Growth and Development
  • The Egg Stage
  • Molting
  • Metamorphosis
  • Insect Seasonal Cycles
  • Insect Feeding
  • Injury by Chewing Insects
  • Injury by Piercing-Sucking Insects
  • Feeding Habits
  • Mites
  • Plant Symptoms of Insect and Mite Feeding
  • Leaf Spots
  • Leaf Curling, Puckering or Rolling
  • Bronzing
  • Premature Leaf Drop
  • Stem and Leaf Galls
  • Cankers and Swelling
  • Branch Dieback
  • Root Damage
  • Insect and Mite Pests Commonly Found in Greenhouses
  • Aphids
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Physical ManagementStrategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Caterpillars
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Fungus Gnats
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Leafminers
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Mealybugs
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Mites
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Scales
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Shore Flies
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Thrips
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Physical ManagementStrategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • Whiteflies
  • Life Cycle
  • Types of Damage
  • Monitoring
  • Cultural Management Strategies
  • Physical ManagementStrategies
  • Biological Management Strategies
  • Biorational Management Strategies
  • Chemical Management Strategies
  • References